A call for further research on the impact of state-level immigration policies on public health

Lisa J Hardy, Christina M. Getrich, Julio C. Quezada, Amanda Guay, Raymond J Michalowski Jr, Eric Henley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Arizona's Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act, signed into law in April 2010, is already adversely affecting public health in the state. Our findings from a study on childhood obesity in Flagstaff suggest that the law changed health-seeking behaviors of residents of a predominantly Latino neighborhood by increasing fear, limiting residents' mobility, and diminishing trust of officials. These changes could exacerbate barriers to healthy living, limit access to care, and affect the overall safety of the neighborhood. Documentation of the on-theground impact of Arizona's law and similar state-level immigration policies is urgently needed. To inform effective policymaking, such research must be community engaged and include safety measures beyond the usual protocols. (AmJPublic Health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1250-1254
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume102
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

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Emigration and Immigration
Public Health
Research
Safety
Law Enforcement
Pediatric Obesity
Health
Hispanic Americans
Documentation
Fear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

A call for further research on the impact of state-level immigration policies on public health. / Hardy, Lisa J; Getrich, Christina M.; Quezada, Julio C.; Guay, Amanda; Michalowski Jr, Raymond J; Henley, Eric.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 7, 07.2012, p. 1250-1254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hardy, Lisa J ; Getrich, Christina M. ; Quezada, Julio C. ; Guay, Amanda ; Michalowski Jr, Raymond J ; Henley, Eric. / A call for further research on the impact of state-level immigration policies on public health. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2012 ; Vol. 102, No. 7. pp. 1250-1254.
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