A 2km-size asteroid challenging the rubble-pile spin barrier - A case for cohesion

D. Polishook, N. Moskovitz, R. P. Binzel, B. Burt, F. E. DeMeo, M. L. Hinkle, M. Lockhart, M. Mommert, M. Person, A. Thirouin, C. A. Thomas, David E Trilling, M. Willman, O. Aharonson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rubble pile spin barrier is an upper limit on the rotation rate of asteroids larger than ~200-300. m. Among thousands of asteroids with diameters larger than ~300. m, only a handful of asteroids are known to rotate faster than 2.0. h, all are in the sub-km range (≤0.6. km). Here we present photometric measurements suggesting that (60716) 2000 GD65, an S-complex, inner-main belt asteroid with a relatively large diameter of 2.3-0.7+0.6km, completes one rotation in 1.9529. ±. 0.0002. h. Its unique diameter and rotation period allow us to examine scenarios about asteroid internal structure and evolution: a rubble pile bound only by gravity; a rubble-pile with strong cohesion; a monolithic structure; an asteroid experiencing mass shedding; an asteroid experiencing YORP spin-up/down; and an asteroid with a unique octahedron shape results with a four-peak lightcurve and a 3.9. h period. We find that the most likely scenario includes a lunar-like cohesion that can prevent (60716) 2000 GD65 from disrupting without requiring a monolithic structure or a unique shape. Due to the uniqueness of (60716) 2000 GD65, we suggest that most asteroids typically have smaller cohesion than that of lunar regolith.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-254
Number of pages12
JournalIcarus
Volume267
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2016

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cohesion
piles
asteroids
asteroid
pile
disrupting
asteroid belts
regolith
uniqueness
gravitation
gravity

Keywords

  • Asteroids
  • Asteroids, rotation
  • Photometry
  • Rotational dynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

Polishook, D., Moskovitz, N., Binzel, R. P., Burt, B., DeMeo, F. E., Hinkle, M. L., ... Aharonson, O. (2016). A 2km-size asteroid challenging the rubble-pile spin barrier - A case for cohesion. Icarus, 267, 243-254. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2015.12.031

A 2km-size asteroid challenging the rubble-pile spin barrier - A case for cohesion. / Polishook, D.; Moskovitz, N.; Binzel, R. P.; Burt, B.; DeMeo, F. E.; Hinkle, M. L.; Lockhart, M.; Mommert, M.; Person, M.; Thirouin, A.; Thomas, C. A.; Trilling, David E; Willman, M.; Aharonson, O.

In: Icarus, Vol. 267, 15.03.2016, p. 243-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Polishook, D, Moskovitz, N, Binzel, RP, Burt, B, DeMeo, FE, Hinkle, ML, Lockhart, M, Mommert, M, Person, M, Thirouin, A, Thomas, CA, Trilling, DE, Willman, M & Aharonson, O 2016, 'A 2km-size asteroid challenging the rubble-pile spin barrier - A case for cohesion', Icarus, vol. 267, pp. 243-254. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2015.12.031
Polishook D, Moskovitz N, Binzel RP, Burt B, DeMeo FE, Hinkle ML et al. A 2km-size asteroid challenging the rubble-pile spin barrier - A case for cohesion. Icarus. 2016 Mar 15;267:243-254. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2015.12.031
Polishook, D. ; Moskovitz, N. ; Binzel, R. P. ; Burt, B. ; DeMeo, F. E. ; Hinkle, M. L. ; Lockhart, M. ; Mommert, M. ; Person, M. ; Thirouin, A. ; Thomas, C. A. ; Trilling, David E ; Willman, M. ; Aharonson, O. / A 2km-size asteroid challenging the rubble-pile spin barrier - A case for cohesion. In: Icarus. 2016 ; Vol. 267. pp. 243-254.
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AU - Thirouin, A.

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