Population Genetics of Clinal ACP1 Variation in Humans

Project: Research projectPostdoctoral Individual National Research Service Award

Description

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The goal of the proposed research is to investigate the molecular population genetics underlying clinal variation at the human acid phosphatase locus (ACP1). Allele frequencies of this protein show a strong correlation with mean annual temperature among human populations, indicating the possible role of natural selection in shaping patterns of variability. We will evaluate this hypothesis by sequencing two portions of the ACP1 gene using a nested sampling design that incorporates both a global human diversity panel and individual population panels from different portions of the cline. Addressing variation of ACP1 at these scales we will be able to characterize the form and strength of selection operating on the locus, and also distinguish how these patterns vary over the cline in ACP1 variability. To date, we have very few examples of human genes that have evolved in response to different physical environments, despite the existence of numerous phenotypic traits that indicate that these challenges have played a strong role in shaping modern patterns of human diversity. With ACP1 we have the opportunity to fill this gap and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying natural selection at this locus.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/12/041/11/06

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $42,976.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $22,871.00

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Population Genetics
Genetic Selection
Acid Phosphatase
Gene Frequency
Population
Genes
Molecular Biology
Temperature
Research
Proteins

Keywords

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)